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intro [19 May 2016 13:25 BST]
pftaylor
intro [29 May 2016 11:32 BST] (current)
pftaylor
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 In 1826 or shortly after, the Caxton Edition appeared. ​ It has a page of Addenda dated October 1826 and a portrait of John Walker, the first British edition to do so, (though I have an American edition dated 1813 with a portrait based on the Barry miniature, and one of 1823 with a portrait of very  questionable artistic merit). Various printings of this edition by various publishers followed, with only the date on the portrait giving any guide as to when, 1860 being the latest that I am aware of.  In 1828 Rev John Davis published his edition in Belfast, the first edition to attempt to separate the words beginning with I and J, and U and V.  This was not the first edition published in Ireland, Wogan having published in Dublin in 1794, 1798 and 1806, but these are often referred to as pirate editions. ​ John Walker was well on the way to becoming a worldwide publishing success, but precisely how this was achieved is not so clear. In 1826 or shortly after, the Caxton Edition appeared. ​ It has a page of Addenda dated October 1826 and a portrait of John Walker, the first British edition to do so, (though I have an American edition dated 1813 with a portrait based on the Barry miniature, and one of 1823 with a portrait of very  questionable artistic merit). Various printings of this edition by various publishers followed, with only the date on the portrait giving any guide as to when, 1860 being the latest that I am aware of.  In 1828 Rev John Davis published his edition in Belfast, the first edition to attempt to separate the words beginning with I and J, and U and V.  This was not the first edition published in Ireland, Wogan having published in Dublin in 1794, 1798 and 1806, but these are often referred to as pirate editions. ​ John Walker was well on the way to becoming a worldwide publishing success, but precisely how this was achieved is not so clear.
   
-The first American edition was published in 1803. In 1806 there were editions in London, Dublin and Philadelphia,​ while the following year there was one in Paris, apparently in French. ​ From 1809 to 1870 there was almost ​no year without at least one printing, most with more, and sixteen ​being the maximum noted so far.  In many years the American printings outnumbered the British ones, and scattered amongst the listings are printings in Germany, Sweden and Canada. ​ Copies from these various countries travelled even further afield, with London printings certainly being exported to Australia by the firm of Tegg.+The first American edition was published in 1803. In 1806 there were editions in London, Dublin and Philadelphia,​ while the following year there was one in Paris, apparently in French. ​ From 1806 to 1877 there was no year without at least one printing, most with more, and eighteen ​being the maximum noted so far.  In many years the American printings outnumbered the British ones, and scattered amongst the listings are printings in Germany, Sweden and Canada. ​ Copies from these various countries travelled even further afield, with London printings certainly being exported to Australia by the firm of Tegg.
  
 One reason for the apparent decline in printings after 1870 is that many publishers stopped dating their books in the second half of the 19th century. ​ Undoubtedly there was a slow but steady decline during the last quarter of the 19th century, but the last printing I am aware of was post 1910, albeit remaindered stock with a new title page bound in, and Walker’s Dictionary was still being advertised as available on the end-papers of other dictionaries,​ particularly Nuttall’s,​ into the 1920s. ​ I have, incidentally,​ used ‘printings’ deliberately since there were, in Britain at any rate, around a dozen actual editions, with publishers reprinting them year after year until the plates wore out, and on at least one occasion, Nuttall’s 1867 printing, making new plates in order to continue. ​ So a reference, under the word ‘Chamber’,​ to ‘30 years ago’ appears in two copies of the same edition printed 45 years apart, and merely repeats what the 1st edition of 40 years earlier had said. One reason for the apparent decline in printings after 1870 is that many publishers stopped dating their books in the second half of the 19th century. ​ Undoubtedly there was a slow but steady decline during the last quarter of the 19th century, but the last printing I am aware of was post 1910, albeit remaindered stock with a new title page bound in, and Walker’s Dictionary was still being advertised as available on the end-papers of other dictionaries,​ particularly Nuttall’s,​ into the 1920s. ​ I have, incidentally,​ used ‘printings’ deliberately since there were, in Britain at any rate, around a dozen actual editions, with publishers reprinting them year after year until the plates wore out, and on at least one occasion, Nuttall’s 1867 printing, making new plates in order to continue. ​ So a reference, under the word ‘Chamber’,​ to ‘30 years ago’ appears in two copies of the same edition printed 45 years apart, and merely repeats what the 1st edition of 40 years earlier had said.
intro.txt · Last modified: 29 May 2016 11:32 BST by pftaylor
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